Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend Neglected Tropical Diseases Congress: The Future Challenges Dubai, UAE.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Stef Stienstra

Dutch Armed Forces, Netherlands

Keynote: Drug delivery by tattooing to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis

Time : 09:00-09:45

Conference Series Tropical Diseases 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Stef Stienstra photo
Biography:

Strategic and creative consultant in biomedical science, with a parallel career in the Dutch Civil-Military Interaction Command in which he has responsibility for the counter measures in CBNRe threats and (medical) consequence management both in a military and a civilian (terrorism) setting. He was the director of the 2014 & 2016 World Congress of CBRNe Science & Consequence Management in Tbilisi, Georgia. He works internationally as consultant or scientific supervisory board member for several medical and biotech companies, merely involved in biodefense, clinical diagnostics and therapies. He is also visiting professor for Punjab University in Pakistan and Rhein-Waal University in Germany and visiting professor at the University of Rome Tor Vergata. He has finished both his studies in Medicine and in Biochemistry at the University of Groningen in The Netherlands and has extensive practical experience in cell biology, immuno-haematology, biodefense and transfusion medicine. His natural business acumen and negotiation competence helps to initiate new successful businesses, often created out of unexpected combinations of technologies. His thorough understanding of abstract science combined with excellent skills in the communication of scientific matters to non-specialists, helps him with strategic consulting at top level management.

Abstract:

Background: Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease that is caused by obligate intra-macrophage protozoa of the Leishmania species. Leishmaniasis can cause different clinical syndromes, including Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL), in which the patient generally presents with one or several ulcer(s) or nodule(s) on the skin, resulting from the infection of phagocytic cells located in the dermis. It often results into severe scar tissue in the skin. Most of the twelve million people infected with leishmania worldwide are CL cases, a 1.5 million new cases occur annually. Objective: WHO has a program to develop new treatments for CL. This study establishes a proof-of-concept that a tattoo device can target intra-dermal drug delivery against CL. Methods: The selected drug is Oleylphosphocholine (OlPC) formulated as liposomes, particles known to be prone to macrophage ingestion. First is shown that treatment of cultured leishmania-infected macrophages with OlPC-liposomes results in a direct dose-dependent killing of intracellular parasites. Based on this, in vivo efficacy is demonstrated using a 10 day tattooing-mediated treatment in mice infected with L. major and L. mexicana. In both models this regimen results in rapid clinical recovery with complete regression of skin lesions by day 28. Parasite counts and histopathology examination confirm high treatment efficacy at the parasitic level. Low amount of drug required for tattooing combined with fast clinical recovery may have a positive impact on CL patient management. Results & Conclusion: This first example of tattoo-mediated drug delivery could open to new therapeutic interventions in the treatment of skin diseases. This study demonstrates that the use of a tattoo instrument for drug delivery is possible in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis and that this method can successfully eliminate intracellular parasites at the site of infection. After showing that the selected drug oleylphosphocholine (OlPC) formulated as liposomes could efficiently reach intracellular parasites when in contact with infected macrophages, the activity of the drug was compared in vivo in mouse models of old (L. major) and new world (L. mexicana) leishmaniasis. Three routes of administrations of the same drug formulation were investigated: Systemic (IP) administration, topical administration as a drop and administration via the tattoo instrument. Evaluation parameters included clinical (lesion sizes) and parasitological parameters (burdens) using quantitative and qualitative methods. In all experiments, the tattooing delivery procedure was the most efficacious at both the clinical and parasitological levels

  • Virology | Medical Virology | Clinical Aspects of Viral Infection | Vaccines for Tropical Diseases | Tropical Viral Diseases
Location: Dubai, UAE
Speaker
Biography:

Ghweil Ali Abdelrahman was a Resident of (Tropical medicine and Gastroenterology) for three years .He worked as a Clinical demonstrator and assistant lecturer of Tropical medicine and Gastroenterology, Sohag University.  He was working as a Lecturer of Tropical medicine and Gastroenterology, South Valley University. Currently, he is the Head of Tropical Medicine and Gastroenterology department, South Valley University. He is also a member of the European Society of Liver Diseases (EASL).
 

Abstract:

We performed a case-series analysis of reactivation of Herpesvirus in patients with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection treated with Direct-Acting Antiviral (DAA) agents. Eight cases were detected among 100 treated patients with direct acting antiviral regimens in Qena University Hospital from June 2016 to June 2017. Herpesvirus was reactivated in 8 patients who received DAA therapy. None of the cases had risk factor for HZ reactivation. The DAAs used regimens were sofosbuvir/ daclatasvir in 6 cases and sofosbuvir/ledipasvir in 2 cases. Immune changes that follow HCV clearance might lead to reactivation of other viruses, such as Herpesvirus. Patients with HCV infection suspected of having Herpesvirus infection should be treated promptly.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Zakeya Al Rasbi works as Assistant Professor, in Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences at United Arab Emirates University the Emirates. Also, she is the Emirates Center for Happiness Research (ECHR) Director. Her research lab focuses on the connection between parasitology and immunology, and how recent studies link parasitic infection in gastrointestinal tract to autoimmune disorders.

Abstract:

Introduction: United Arab Emirates is a multicultural country and approximately 65% of the population are expatriates from low- and middle-income developing countries that have a high burden of intestinal parasitic infections (IPI). Aim: The primary aim is to estimate the prevalence of, and factors associated with IPI in an occupational sample of expatriates in Al-Ain. Methodology: This study utilized an observational analytical cross- sectional study and recruited a representative sample of expatriate employees. Participants completed a questionnaire; and provided a fresh stool sample. Fecal specimens were analyzed for a range of IPI species using microscopy, Ziehl–Neelsen stain, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. Results: 25% of participants harbored intestinal parasites; 15% with protozoa, while 10% had helminths infection according to microscopy diagnosis. Higher incidents of protozoa and helminths infection were identified using PCR. Conclusion: IPI can be found in more than quarter of the survey population and this conclusion shed a light on the importance of this study in understanding the pattern of IPI infection and transmission in the UAE.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Ghweil Ali Abdelrahman was a Resident of (Tropical medicine and Gastroenterology) for three years .He worked as a Clinical demonstrator and assistant lecturer of Tropical medicine and Gastroenterology, Sohag University.  He was working as a Lecturer of Tropical medicine and Gastroenterology, South Valley University. Currently, he is the Head of Tropical Medicine and Gastroenterology department, South Valley University. He is also a member of the European Society of Liver Diseases (EASL).
 

Abstract:

Background & Aim: Assessment of fibrosis in chronic hepatitis has always been considered of utmost relevance for patient care in clinical hepatology. Over the last years, multiple non-invasive methods were used for diagnosis of hepaic fibrosis, including transient elastography in addition to clinical and biochemical parameters or combinations of both methods. Serum markers and elastography are considered useful techniques for diagnosing severe liver fibrosis and cirrhosis and for excluding significant fibrosis in hepatitis C virus infected patients. Also, liver stiffness may help to foretell treatment response to antiviral therapy. We aimed to evaluate changes of transient elastography values as well as serum fibronectin and AST to Platelet Ratio Index in Patients (APRI) treated with sofosbuvir based treatment regimen. Methods: This is a follow-up study including 100 chronic HCV Egyptian patients treated with sofosbuvir-based treatment regimen. Transient elastography values were recorded as well as serum fibronectin and APRI were calculated at baseline and SVR12. Results: There was a significant improvement of platelets counts, ALT and AST levels, which in turn cause significant improvement in APRI scores at SVR12. Liver stiffness measurements were significantly lower at SVR12 (15.40±8.96 vs. 8.82±4.74 kPa, P=0.000). There was significant decline in serum fibronectin from baseline to SVR 12 (524.14±237.61 vs. 287.48±137.67, P=0.000).
 

Speaker
Biography:

Dephney Mathebula has her expertise in multi-scale modeling of infectious diseases such as schistosomiasis, malaria and influenza. Her passion is in improving the implementation of infectious diseases control measures by developing multi-scale models that account for both between-host and within-host disease dynamics. Her multi-scale model adequately accounts for the reciprocal influence of the linked within-host and between-host models.

Abstract:

In this study, we develop a multi-scale model that integrates the within-host and between-host transmission dynamics of schistosomiasis. The resulting linked models are sometimes called immuno-epidemiological models. However, there is still no generalized framework for linking the within-host and between-host dynamics of infectious diseases. Moreover, for environmentally transmitted infections, there is a gap in knowledge on how environmental factors alter many aspects of such infections including susceptibility to infective dose, persistence of infection, pathogen shedding and severity of the disease. In this work, we integrate the within-host and between-host sub-models by identifying the within-host and between-host variables and parameters associated with the environmental dynamics of the pathogen and then design a feedback of the variables and parameters across the within-host and between-host models using human schistosomiasis as a case study. We study the mathematical properties of the linked model and show that the model is epidemiologically well-posed. Using results from the analysis of the endemic equilibrium expression, the disease reproductive number and numerical simulations of the full model, we adequately account for the reciprocal influence of the linked within-host and between-host sub-models. We expect the conceptual modeling framework developed here to be applicable to many environmentally transmitted infectious diseases other than the specific disease system of human schistosomiasis considered here.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Camille F is currently finishing her PhD on the study of perceptions and behaviors related to arboviral infections among the population of French Guiana at the Epidemiology Unit at Pasteur Institute of French Guiana with Dr. Claude Flamand. She has 7 publications in the field of infectious diseases and already presented her research in three congresses.
 

Abstract:

The recent emergence of chikungunya and Zika virus worldwide aroused global attention due to their rapid spread and high potential for epidemics. Effective management of new arboviruses risks in the phase that no specific treatment or vaccination is yet possible is largely dependent on precautionary behavior of the population. The knowledge and understanding of the mechanisms underlying perceptions and behaviors are essential for authorities in charge of vector-borne diseases prevention to implement effective communication and promote precautionary practices. In the context of emerging arboviruses in French Guiana, we conducted two surveys among students and the general population respectively. A multifactorial analysis and a logistic ordinal regression were performed to explore and assess risk perceptions and protective behaviors and identify their potential determinants among the population of French Guiana. An emergent arboviral disease appeared as a new health threat that concern the public more than others existing Aedes mosquito-borne diseases, with a significant degree of perceived worry and severity. Furthermore, perceptions varied considerably among different social groups and geographic areas with an important gender effect related to Zika perceptions. Women were significantly more afraid about Zika, felt more exposed and characterized the disease as more severe and as affecting the patient more than did men (p<0.001). The adoption of protective behaviors was associated with socio economic and environmental factors, risk perceptions and behaviors. A negative association between the level of knowledge and the adoption of protective behaviors was observed (OR=0.69 [0.49-0.98]). Our results suggest that the adoption of protective behaviors would not necessarily rely on the knowledge but on individual factors and perceptions associated with the disease, as a multi-factorial process.  Such data will be subsequently analyzed with seroprevalence data in order to identify from these socio-behavioral factors which are potential determinant of the infection of dengue, chikungunya and/or Zika viruses.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Strategic and creative consultant in biomedical science, with a parallel career in the Dutch Civil-Military Interaction Command in which he has responsibility for the counter measures in CBNRe threats and (medical) consequence management both in a military and a civilian (terrorism) setting. He was the director of the 2014 & 2016 World Congress of CBRNe Science & Consequence Management in Tbilisi, Georgia. He works internationally as consultant or scientific supervisory board member for several medical and biotech companies, merely involved in biodefense, clinical diagnostics and therapies. He is also visiting professor for Punjab University in Pakistan and Rhein-Waal University in Germany and visiting professor at the University of Rome Tor Vergata. He has finished both his studies in Medicine and in Biochemistry at the University of Groningen in The Netherlands and has extensive practical experience in cell biology, immuno-haematology, biodefense and transfusion medicine. His natural business acumen and negotiation competence helps to initiate new successful businesses, often created out of unexpected combinations of technologies. His thorough understanding of abstract science combined with excellent skills in the communication of scientific matters to non-specialists, helps him with strategic consulting at top level management.
 

Abstract:

Speaker
Biography:

Ghweil Ali Abdelrahman was a Resident of (Tropical medicine and Gastroenterology) for three years .He worked as a Clinical demonstrator and assistant lecturer of Tropical medicine and Gastroenterology, Sohag University.  He was working as a Lecturer of Tropical medicine and Gastroenterology, South Valley University. Currently, he is the Head of Tropical Medicine and Gastroenterology department, South Valley University. He is also a member of the European Society of Liver Diseases (EASL).
 

Abstract: